Review: Viaje inesperado

Bathos extraordinaire.

by Benjamín Harguindey

Juan José Jusid is a venerable Argentine filmmaker who made some wonderful cult films in the 70’s and 80’s but only aced the local box office in the late 90’s and early 2000’s with folksy screwball comedies starring TV humorists and “it” couples. Viaje inesperado (“Unexpected Journey”) marks his return following an eight-year hiatus, but the movie is less than opportune.

Continue reading “Review: Viaje inesperado”

Review: Venom

Needs an antidote.

by Benjamín Harguindey

Venom (2018) joins the ranks of the likes of Suicide Squad (2016) and Deadpool 2 (2018) as the kind of movie that wants to be both an edgy answer to Marvel’s all-too-cozy EU and a relief to the superhero fatigue, yet amounts to precisely the same thing it’s supposedly riffing on. It’s a sorry, disappointing result.

Continue reading “Review: Venom”

Review: The Predator

A comedy of predators.

by Benjamín Harguindey

The most surprising aspect of this sorta-sequel, sorta-reboot to Predator is that it forsakes the series’ signature horror – a dreadful sense  of primal vulnerability and cosmic indifference much like Alien‘s – for camp comedy. If John McTiernan’s seminal 1987 film elevated itself out of the B-horror depths, Shane Black’s version crawls right back and gleefully wallows in it.

Continue reading “Review: The Predator”

Review: Piazzolla, the Years of the Shark

Fishing for sharks and music.

by Iñaki Oñate

Piazzolla, los años del tiburón (Piazzolla, the Years of the Shark, 2018) starts with the moving image of the  Mar del Plata sea and the sound of an old recorded interview in which we listen to the voice of master musician Astor Piazolla. He explains the parallelism between playing his music live and fishing for sharks, his two favorite activities, saying they both demand immense physical exertion but offer an intense feeling of life and bliss.

Continue reading “Review: Piazzolla, the Years of the Shark”

Review: El Ángel

A dark, intriguing character study.

by Benjamín Harguindey

El Ángel (“The Angel”), which made its acclaimed debut earlier this year at the Cannes film festival and now rises to the coveted million-spectator mark in its native Argentina, is loosely inspired in the year-long crime spree of Carlos Robledo Puch, one of Argentina’s most infamous serial killers and to date its longest-serving prisoner. He was only 20 when he was sentenced in 1973. Smug, vicious, coquettish and graced with the face of an angel, Puch remains one of the most alluring and puzzling criminal cases.

Continue reading “Review: El Ángel”

Review: Ant-Man and the Wasp

Small fry.

by Benjamín Harguindey

It’s hard to chase a movie like Avengers: Infinity War (2018) with something like Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018), if nothing else because the massive superhero crossover took a franchise ten years in the making and did something relatively bold and novel with it. Of course novelty is short-lived in the realm of comic book status quo, and the boldness feels like a bluff designed to hype up the next movie. Either way there’s not a lot to care for in this Ant-Man (2015) sequel.

Continue reading “Review: Ant-Man and the Wasp”

Review: Jurassic World: The Fallen Kingdom

The dinosaurs are going to disappear.

by Iñaki Oñate

We should’ve paid more attention to Dr. Malcom’s advice. We should’ve stopped the dinos before it was too late. Now we are witnessing the downfall of one the most iconic and successful Hollywood franchises of all time.

Continue reading “Review: Jurassic World: The Fallen Kingdom”